Tag Archives: New Bomb Turks

Anyway Records 20th Anniversary show

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Perhaps you heard about this on the Facebooks already, but if not, you really need to see this lineup, going down at Ace of Cups 12/21 and 12/22.

9:00 – St. Lenox
9:30 – Winter Makes Sailors
10:00 – Obnox
10:30 – New Bomb Turks
11:30 – Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments
12:15 – NECROPOLIS – covering Gaunt

SATURDAY – KIDS SHOW: 6-8pm – Free
Chris Biester (from ADR)

8:00 – Belreve
8:45 – Jenny Mae
9:15 – Kyle Sowashes
10:00 – Moviola
10:45 – County Pharaohs
11:30 – Connections
12:30 – Greenhorn

Divine Fits perform “Would That Not Be Nice” on Jimmy Fallon

Watch: Divine Fits album teaser

Last week we told you about Divine Fits, a new supergroup consisting of Britt Daniel of Spoon, Sam Brown of the New Bomb Turks and Dan Boeckner of Wolf Parade (and the recently defunct Handsome Furs). Now the band has posted a video with just a bit of teaser music from the coming album on Merge Records. Watch the dancing blob and give it a listen…

New Band Alert: Divine Fits featuring New Bomb Turks’ Sam Brown, Spoon’s Britt Daniel, Wolf Parade’s Dan Boeckner

Look for an album from the supergroup on MERGE RECORDS later this year. Says the press release, “The album was was produced by Nick Launay. Further details regarding the record’s release date, live dates, etc. will be announced as they are confirmed.”

Till then, stay tuned to the Divine Fits home page and Twitter. We’ll have more from Mr. Brown soon, too.

Thursday: Jay Reatard doc @ Wex

On Thursday in Columbus, the Wexner Center will screen the new documentary Better Than Something: Jay Reatard, a film about prolific Memphis punk-rocker Jimmy Lee Lindsey Jr. aka Jay Reatard, who died in 2010 at the age of 29. What began as a series of 2009 interviews with Lindsey for a promotional documentary called Waiting for Something became a larger project after his death, as the filmmakers sought out Lindsey’s friends, family members and former bandmates to fill out the picture of a controversial figure, known for his on-stage vitriol as much as his hooks. (I remember him hurling at least two insults at crowd members during his show at the Summit just a couple months before he died.)

The A.V. Club describes the doc this way: “Better Than Something doesn’t really try to resolve the mystery of how someone could be simultaneously so productive and destructive. But given how briefly Jay Reatard was in the public eye, it’s a thrill to see so much performance footage in Better Than Something, as well as to hear multiple perspectives on some of the most legendary Reatard antics.”

The Wexner Center is also bringing in Eric Davidson, singer for the legendary Columbus band New Bomb Turks, to introduce the screening. Davidson wrote about Jay Reatard in his book We Never Learn: The Gunk Punk Undergut, 1988–2001. Davidson will also DJ and sign books from 5:30-7 in the Wex store.

Ace of Cups hosts the post-screening party with Angry Cougars, Slave Labia and Nervosas.

Donewaiting 9: Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments

MP3: My Mysterious Death (Turn It Up)

The more your hear about the origin of Old Columbus bands, the more you realize how many of them formed accidentally, the result of spontaneity and serendipity. Thomas Jefferson Slave Apartments was one such band. On a night about 20 years ago, soon after the dissolution of Ron House’s previous band, Great Plains, a band playing Stache’s ended early.

The story could have ended right there. Everyone at the bar could have just continued to get drunk and/or gone home. Instead, though, House and Girly Machine guitarist Bob Petric hopped on stage with some friends, borrowed the idle guitars and amps and started jamming on blues riffs. “We just kind of jumped up out of sheer boredom,” Petric said when I interviewed him last year. But something clicked, and they decided to do it again. And again. (Sound familiar?)

“It was kind of a fuck-off band for a couple of years where we just got together and jammed,” House said last summer. “The Columbus scene was really taking off—like the New Bomb Turks, Gaunt. So I didn’t have to do very much, just shout and scream and people would notice us locally. The whole scene was a more brutal, punkier scene. There was enough things going on that all we had to do was just go out and play and things would happen for us.” Continue reading

Win tickets to Ohio Film+Music Festival

We’re just over a week away from the Ohio Film+Music Festival, which means we’re just over a week away from bands like RJD2/Icebird, the New Bomb Turks, Heartless Bastards, Cloud Nothings and others, plus films like never-before-seen Jim Jarmusch shorts featuring Tom Waits, 4192: The Crowning of the Hit King and Eric Mahoney’s North Dixie Drive.

So, in anticipation, we’re giving away two tickets to the Friday, Oct. 7 New Bomb Turks / Heartless Bastards / Cloud Nothings / R.Ring (featuring Kelley Deal) show at Skully’s and two film tickets to the Ohio Doc Double Feature, The Last Truck: The Closing of a GM Plant shown with North Dixie Drive (Saturday, Oct. 8 at 3:55pm). Just send an email to contestdonewaiting@gmail.com with the subject OFMF by next Wednesday (10/5).

Ticketing details for all events at OFMF.

Ohio Film + Music Fest Oct. 6-9 in Columbus: Heartless Bastards, RJD2, New Bomb Turks, Blueprint, Cloud Nothings, more

The Ohio Film + Music Festival is a brand-new “curated, 4-day film and music event, exhibiting Ohio native directors, bands and musicians,” and the first round of confirmations alone is reason enough to get excited. So far the inaugural lineup looks like this:

Heartless Bastards
New Bomb Turks
Main St. Gospel
Cloud Nothings
R. Ring (feat. Kelley Deal)
Buffalo Killers

The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant (Steven Bognar + Julia Reichert)
True Nature (Patrick Steele)
Stranger than Paradise (Jim Jarmusch)
4,192: The Crowning of the Hit King (Terry Lukemire)
45365 (Ross Bros)
Deadbeat At Dawn (Jim Van Bebber)
North Dixie Drive (Eric Mahoney)
Double-Stop (Roger + Gerald Sindell)
Outside In (Todd Volkmer)

Eric Mahoney and Mr. Scott Johnson promise additional lineup announcements, ticket info and more details soon. Keep up with OFMF on Facebook and Twitter.

Remembering Jerry Wick: Interview With Bret Lewis

This interview with Bret Lewis took place prior to the Gaunt tribute show at the Summit January 1st. To read about the actual show, here is Rick Allen’s review.

I grew up on rap so my knowledge of Gaunt is from osmosis. I’m not an expert.

Yeah, but you said you grew up with Nick Shuld?

Yeah, I like that guy now. But at the time he was a year older and seemed snooty. So when he joined Gaunt, it was another reason to hate on him.

Was he with Beano?

Yeah. They were fun. When did you join Gaunt?

I was the bass player. Basically, Jeff and Eric …  Jeff Regesnburger, the drummer. Eric Barth was the bassist.  They did a European Tour in 94; say from October to December.  Then quit.

Nick and I joined in January.

What were you doing before then?

Musically or in my life? Continue reading

Overlooked in Ohio Vol. 6: Belreve

Editor’s note: “Overlooked in Ohio” is a feature in which we ask an Ohio-based artist/music enthusiast to tell us about a band or bands from the state of Ohio (past or present) that deserve some love. Our sixth installment comes courtesy of Nick Schuld — resurrecter of Datapanik, player in Obviouslies and unearther of various Ohio treasures over at Minimum Tillage Farming. Nick has been here too long and is now insane.

Photos by Jay Brown; copyright 2010 jfotoman

MP3: Assorted tracks from Cowtown EP, 45s, etc. (mediafire archive courtesy Minimum Tillage Farming)
MP3: Walk

A little while before I moved to Columbus in the summer of 1988 I discovered the glorious phenomenon that is the used record shop, so one of the first things I did when I got here was to scan the yellow pages for all the locals. At the time, cds still seemed neat and lotsa previously hard-to-find (for me at least, in small-town Virginia) stuff was showing up on that most durable of physical formats (*ahem*), so I took my giant Bekins box of tapes to Used Kids and wandered upstairs soon after with loot in hand to “little Mag’s” – the relatively short-lived cousin of the still-thriving shop now calling the Short North home – since Used Kids was still strictly analog. (Well, maybe they had a few discs in a magazine rack by the door – but they woulda prolly been a little to the current/good/hip/obscure side of the Misfits and Lemonheads ones I was jazzed about.) Little Mag’s was cool, trafficked mostly in t-shirts, and closed pretty soon after.

Fortunately this fate didn’t befall Used Kids (tho’ I did buy a t-shirt there once), and in the following months I started going down to the shop whenever I could find a ride or felt sufficiently over-enthusiastic enough to ride my skateboard from the suburbs and back. One day I bought a My Bloody Valentine tape and the guy behind the counter mentioned how good the upcoming show at the Ohio Union Ballroom was gonna be. I think I averted my eyes and barely mumble-nodded in agreement on my way out the door – for I was not always the obnoxiously assertive lug you all now recognize – but after the show I grabbed the fellow and yelled over the ringing in my ears how indeed it WAS quite the revelation. He grinned and said the last song was on their best record and had I heard it? I said no and he said he’d tape it for me; thus, my introduction to the illustrious Ron House. Continue reading